Lightning Dreamwork Game


by Robert Moss

This is a fun way to share dreams, get some nonauthoritarian and nonintrusive feedback, and move toward creative action.

This is something that you can do quickly (within five minutes). It can be played anywhere with anyone who is willing.

Begin by creating a safe space to share even the most sensitive aspects.

There are four moves to the game.

The First Move is where the Dreamer tells the dream as simply and clearly as possible, as a story. Just the facts of the dream, no background or autobiography. In telling a dream this way, the Dreamer claims the power of the story. The Partner should ask the Dreamer to give the dream report a title, like a story or a movie.

The Second Move The Partner asks the Three Essential Questions.

  1. How did you feel?
  2. Reality check: What do you recognize from this dream in the rest of your life, and could any part of this dream be played out in the future?
  3. What do you want to know about this now?

The Dreamer answers all three questions.

The Third Move The Partner now shares whatever thoughts and associations the dream has triggered for them.

The Partner begins by saying, “If it were my dream, I would think about such­and­such.”

The etiquette is very important. By saying “if it were my dream,” we make it clear that we are not setting out to tell the Dreamer what his or her dream – or life – means. We are not posing as experts of any kind. The Partner is just sharing whatever strikes him or her about the dream This  may include personal memories, other dreams, or things that just pop up. (Those seemingly random pop­ups are often the best.)

Fourth Move Following the discussion, the Partner asks the Dreamer: What are you going to do now? What action will you take to honor this dream or work with its guidance?

If the Dreamer is clueless about what action to take, the Partner will offer his or her own suggestions. This may range from calling the guy up or buying the pink shoes to doing historical or linguistic research to decode odd references. Or, the Dreamer may want to go back inside the dream to get more information as a way of moving beyond amy fear the dream has stirred up.

One thing we can do with any dream is to write a personal motto, like a bumper sticker or something that could go on a refrigerator magnet.

­ The rules of this game are adapted from the version in The Three “Only” Things: Tapping the Power of Dreams, Coincidence and Imagination by Robert Moss. Published by New World Library. © Robert Moss